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LifeVantage Lies About Protandim’s Safety

[The following post is from Vogel. Here he shines a spotlight on LifeVantage's attempt to mislead and lie to consumers once again.]

Just came across a corporate press release from LFVN in which they made the following claim:

“Protandim Is Certified by Banned Substances Control Group (BSCG) as Safe for Consumers and Athletes”

BSCG is a so-called certifying "organization" – but one that seems to serve the MLM industry exclusively (red flag #1).

What's really deceptive about the press release is that the BSCG does not conduct "safety" tests; they only test for the presence of substances banned for competitive athletes. It’s one thing for the company to say that Protandim is certified to be free of substances banned by the IOC, for example, which is relevant only if one is a competitive athlete who doesn’t want to fail a doping test after ingesting a dietary supplement. However, it’s a straight up lie to claim that Protandim "has been certified... as safe for consumers”. The BSCG provided no such certification about safety or anything relevant to non-athletes (i.e. general consumers).

Under US law, supplement manufacturers are not allowed to make unqualified safety claims about their products unless they submit reliable safety data from high-quality studies to the FDA for assessment and approval. LFVN has not done so. In fact, they have no published human safety data at all. When supplement manufacturers use GRAS ("generally recognized as safe") ingredients, there is an inherent assumption that they are “generally” safe, but there are many examples of supplements with GRAS ingredients that can have serious side effects. That’s why the FDA does not allow manufacturers to make unqualified safety claims. Furthermore, if a company uses ingredients in novel combinations, then it can’t be assumed that the safety profile is the same as when the ingredients are taken individually. This is particularly relevant to Protandim, since LFVN claims that the ingredients display unique “synergistic” properties. In that light, the safety of Protandim is even more uncertain. The FDA states:

"Where there is reason to suspect that the combination of multiple ingredients might result in interactions that would alter the effect or safety of the individual ingredients, studies showing the effect of the individual ingredients may be insufficient to substantiate the safety of the multiple ingredient product. A better approach would be to investigate the safety of the specific combination of ingredients contained in the product."

To make matters worse, LFVN even acknowledges in their FAQs that Protandim can cause side effects (allergic responses, stomach ache, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, and rash of the hands and feet). Obviously, it’s not entirely safe and they shouldn't be deceiving consumers to the contrary.

Originally posted 2011-09-02 16:38:47.

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LifeVantage Lies

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8 Responses to “LifeVantage Lies About Protandim’s Safety”
  1. Antonio Says:

    we know how screwed up the FDA is… with FDA “approved” drugs killing thousands of people every year. Take a look:

    AERS1 Patient Outcomes by Year

    Year Death Serious Side Effect
    2000 19,445 153,818
    2001 23,988 166,384
    2002 28,181 159,000
    2003 35,173 177,008
    2004 34,928 199,510
    2005 40,238 257,604
    2006 37,465 265,130
    2007 36,834 273,276
    2008 49,958 319,741
    2009 63,846 373,535

    Statistics from the U.S. National Poison Data System prove otherwise. According to a 174-page report just published, the number of people killed in 2009 across America by vitamins, minerals, amino acids or herbal supplements is exactly zero.

    Compare that to the 100,000 (or so) Americans killed each year by FDA-approved pharmaceuticals — and that’s even according to studies published in JAMA.

    NO OFFENSE but I will stick with my Protandim that has done amazing things for my ill loved ones and me!!

  2. Protandim Scams Says:

    [Editor's note: Using a name of "Me" will get you an alias in these forums. There are too many "Me"s. In this case, I've picked Antonio. ]

    Antonio,

    Here’s an article that addresses the logic: http://www.healthmlmscam.com/health-mlm-mind-game-the-fda-approves-drugs-with-side-effects-that-kill-people/

  3. Joe Jackson Says:

    Okay 1. Every statement a distributor is LEGALLY allowed to say: have all been submitted to the FDA. All claims. If you’re talking about Bob down the street who sales it, and claims it does XYZ outside of what it legally claims; well that is the equivalent of blaming Ford for being shady because a local dealership owner of Ford vehicles told you the damn car could FLY… But you know what, before even breaking down FDA approval and even taking it that far, let’s run with your logic and assume everything you are saying is 100% correct, with no false or misleading information yourself (which we will touch later): Let’s tackle the FDA bug together… I’m sure through your extensive research, you knew to simply check the FDA’s own website and view how many, if ANY warnings LifeVantage has received for their false claims or misleading information.

    After reading the requirements with the FDA, submission of claims have been made (again, LEGAL claims.. what is said individually is different; AND the discussion of legit peer reviewed studies with Protandim and other diseases or health problems doesn’t necessarily mean people are running around saying it’s curing anything, or fda-anything. other than what has been submitted to the fda):

    FDA
    http://www.fda.gov/food/dietarysupplements/default.htm

    Discussion of Protandim
    http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dockets/97s0162/97s-0162-let16091-vol142.pdf?utm_campaign=Google2&utm_source=fdaSearch&utm_medium=website&utm_term=protandim&utm_content=1

    Very quick research.. I looked for warnings, or ACTUAL links to the government sites showing any actual negativity toward Protandim…. All the negativity Google seems to bring me to are a few blog posts of those who claim they’ve done their research, but stop at the bs “technicalities” they don’t even understand, and run with it, while screaming fire..

    “what technicalities??” –


    BSCG only serves the MLM industry:
    BSCG tests dietary supplements for any ingredients that have been banned by various organizations (IOC, USADA,NCAA, NFL, etc.)

    In researching MORE about it, wondering “why doesn’t the BSCG regulate more than the MLM industry:

    1. Why do they need to? They exist as a business ONLY to serve the MLM industry. Much like an iPhone App company ONLY makes apps for iPhone (not Android). Much like certain companies ONLY make products specifically for a certain private sector, group, etc. Shady?? .. subjective topic but nonetheless a misleading point for you to have brought up.


    The BSCG provided no such certification about safety or anything relevant to non-athletes (i.e. general consumers):

    1.Umm. They are ONLY going off a list that exists in nearly all professional sports, as a “reference chart”. Their site flat out SAID it lol… no wait: their NAME says it all: BANNED SUBSTANCES control group… If it’s UNSAFE for an athelete, chances are, it’s just as unsafe for non as well, assuming both are human?? Orrr??? …. Really man…?? Example: If the following drink is not safe for — I don’t know Michael Jordan to take, then maybe it’s NOT safe for … “a regular human/consumer?” ….


    Obviously, it’s not entirely safe and they shouldn’t be deceiving consumers to the contrary:

    You misunderstand. Better yet, how many commercials of various FDA approved drug-based products claim XYZ but then list out the numerous possible side effects EVEN when taken as directed? Some go as far as: DEATH.

    If you are allergic to any of the primary ingredients in Protandim, you may experience the side effects. Of course, that’s common sense AND THAT is “doing your research” on a product. You find out “Oh! so if I’m allergic to any of this, I may experience the following… ok then!” As with any website with any drug/supplement out there.. But for that reason alone to stop you from paying $40 and screaming scam and deceptive and full of lies… well, those who are known to be the negative cynics in a group that know so much for their own good.. well, often show their stubbornness and lack of willingness to REALLY find out the TRUTH about a certain product or company or statement they have made… But if you’re up for the challenge, as am I!! without regurtitating any of the BS you get told about the MLM business model, or LifeVantage, or Protandim, and without me regurgitating any of the BS given about how to reply to those who challenge the company.

    If you TRULY want to help others, then I’m inviting you to the challenge of getting to the bottom of things on BOTH sides (not a one sided research column). If you’re too busy, don’t feel you have/want to, etc etc, whatever excuse, then I understand, and oh well this’ll be my last post… If not, reply here, and I will gladly go to each post already made and attempt to give credit where due and challenge where necessary, OUTSIDE of what half the other posters have given you…

  4. protandimscams Says:

    I’m going to try to cover everything you wrote here, but it is a little difficult to follow with the formatting. If anything is missed, leave a follow up comment.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “Every statement a distributor is LEGALLY allowed to say: have all been submitted to the FDA. All claims. If you’re talking about Bob down the street who sales it, and claims it does XYZ outside of what it legally claims; well that is the equivalent of blaming Ford for being shady because a local dealership owner of Ford vehicles told you the damn car could FLY…”

    I’d like to point out that Ford dealerships are a little different. They have invested millions of dollars in their franchise/dealership. If one salesman makes that mistake, you can bet that they are going to put a stop that right away because they don’t want Ford to pull the whole dealership’s license.

    In the case of LifeVantage, or just about any MLM, the distributor has only a hundred dollars or so to lose. If that distributor makes an illegal claim there’s no system of correction in place. It’s not like the upline has their business threatened. In fact, since the upline stands to gain, and has nothing to lose, if a distributor makes an erroneous claim illegal claims aren’t discouraged.

    It’s not just a case where a rogue MLM distributor makes up an illegal claim like a Ford salesman claiming the car can fly. These illegal claims are fed to distributors from LifeVantage themselves: Kirby Zenger, LifeVantage COO, Illegally Claims Protandim is a Cancer Drug (and a Whole Lot More!), Joe McCord Illegally Says that Protandim is about Cancer Prevention, and LifeVantage President Encourages Distributors to Break FDA and FTC Laws. These are just a few of the cases that we have documented evidence for. Who knows what is going on when the camera isn’t running? This is the equivalent of Ford telling the dealerships and salesmen that Fords are the only cars that can fly. It’s a systematic failure of training that starts at the top and spreads throughout the whole organization. You can most certainly blame Ford for it.

    Finally it is worth noting that with cars, if a salesman were to make a claim about a car, such as suggesting that it can fly, the consumer would be able to evaluate that claim by saying, “show me it flying.” When a distributor makes an illegal claim that Protandim can prevent cancer what consumer responds with, “show me it preventing cancer.” It simply can’t be objectively shown. Many MLMs stick to these products because ditributors don’t have to objectively show the product working.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “Let’s tackle the FDA bug together…. I looked for warnings, or ACTUAL links to the government sites showing any actual negativity toward Protandim… All the negativity Google seems to bring me to are a few blog posts of those who claim they’ve done their research, but stop at the bs ‘technicalities’ they don’t even understand, and run with it, while screaming fire…”

    I couldn’t quite follow your entire point here as you have a link to “discussion of Protandim”, but it simply a standard regulatory filing that has been discussed in detail in comments at the complete guide to LifeVantage and Protandim. However, that said, here’s what I have to say on the part that I quoted which was clear…

    It seems like your point here is that because the FDA hasn’t posted any warnings there are no problems with Protandim. This is confusing a lack of law enforcement with legality. With the FDA and MLM it has been a problem for 25 years. Here’s an article from Money Magazine in 1987:

    “Many of the most popular MLM companies sell vitamins and nutritional products such as ersatz milk shakes. They frequently take advantage of the Food and Drug Administration’s recent see-no-evil policy toward taking action against misleading claims made about such products. (In late April, the FDA took one step by telling three cosmetics companies — none MLMs — to stop making some claims for their anti-aging skin-care products or register them as drugs with the FDA.) Stephen Barrett, editor of the monthly newsletter Nutrition Forum and recipient of a 1984 award from the FDA for exposing nutritional quackery, says: ‘I’ve told the FDA of 300 illegally marketed products, many of them from multilevel companies, but the agency has taken no action on them.’ An FDA spokesman responds: ‘A good number of nutritional products fall into the area of puffery claims, rather than representing a direct health threat. While these products may be in technical violation of the law, we won’t spend our resources to challenge the claims.’”

    Later on the magazine recommends:

    “The Food and Drug Administration should zealously enforce an existing law that lets the agency halt fraudulent claims made by nutrition companies. Says Stephen Barrett: ‘The FDA’s enforcement program is ineffective.’”

    Not much has changed in that regard over the last 25 years. The FDA simply doesn’t have the resources to pursue millions of MLM distributors making illegal claims.

    As for there only be a few blog posts, remember that well over 99.99% of the blog posts on Protandim come from distributors who are paid to make sales of product. Websites such as this one are just trying to help consumers and ask no money from readers.

    As for the technicalities, sites like this one and this one cover them in very good detail showing a proficiency in understandig them. It is worth pointing out these two sites have shown numerous times in the comments that LifeVantage’s sales force and customer base don’t understand the technicalities. This is why it is best for LifeVantage to get Protandim approved by the FDA for any medical conditions it thinks it can help. Their current method of pointing people to look at PubMed.gov and ignore ClinicalTrials.gov is fostering a huge problem. You don’t see a cholesterol medication direct people to PubMed.gov for more information on the product’s effectiveness.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “In researching MORE about it, wondering ‘why doesn’t the BSCG regulate more than the MLM industry:’

    1. Why do they need to? They exist as a business ONLY to serve the MLM industry. Much like an iPhone App company ONLY makes apps for iPhone (not Android). Much like certain companies ONLY make products specifically for a certain private sector, group, etc. Shady?? .. subjective topic but nonetheless a misleading point for you to have brought up.”

    A software development house that makes iPhone apps only do so because their expertise is in the Apple development tools and focusing on one platform means that they don’t have to go out and hire Android engineers. In stark contrast, health products are health products. BSCG wouldn’t have to hire more people or learn any new techniques to take clients who have a traditional method of distribution.

    In short, development for an iPhone app is very different from that of an Android app, but testing health products are the same whether they are sold in GNC or via MLM… or dropped out of an airplane.

    “Shady” is a logical conclusion for a company that seems to take clients based on the distribution method rather than a variety of clients based on the typical distribution of companies creating the products.

    It is much more misleading for you to bring up a failed analogy such as the iPhone vs. Android app comparison.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “1.Umm. They are ONLY going off a list that exists in nearly all professional sports, as a ‘reference chart.’ Their site flat out SAID it lol… no wait: their NAME says it all: BANNED SUBSTANCES control group… If it’s UNSAFE for an athelete, chances are, it’s just as unsafe for non as well, assuming both are human?? Orrr??? …. Really man…?? Example: If the following drink is not safe for — I don’t know Michael Jordan to take, then maybe it’s NOT safe for … ‘a regular human/consumer?’ …. “

    I think you missed the entire point here, but caught some of it… especially with the “BANNED SUBSTANCES” highlighting. This is a group that is simply testing for banned substances. In this case, “safe” means that you won’t get disqualified from a sporting organization for it. (That’s the point about the banned substances.) However, the press release suggests that the product is “safe” for consumers. Since general consumers are not athletes and not subject to disqualification from other sporting organizations they would likely take the typical definition of “safe” which is “not harmful.”

    The BSCG did not test Protandim to ensure it is not harmful to general consumers. That’s where the misleading press release comes into play.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “You misunderstand. Better yet, how many commercials of various FDA approved drug-based products claim XYZ but then list out the numerous possible side effects EVEN when taken as directed? Some go as far as: DEATH… “

    The point about LifeVantage misleading consumers is clear. This quote here is unrelated. The point about the FDA and other numerous side effects has nothing to do with how consumers are being mislead in this press release.

    Joe Jackson, it appears you are simply bringing up the Health MLM Mind Game: The FDA Approves Drugs with Side Effects that Kill People. Perhaps, you can clarify your point with this or just do a little reading to see why this is irrelevant to the topic of Protandim.

    I accept your challenge. Please do better than you have done here.

  5. Vogel Says:

    Joe said: “Every statement a distributor is LEGALLY allowed to say: have all been submitted to the FDA.”

    That’s a lie and it’s been covered in detail on Lazyman’s Protandim site already. US law (CFR) makes it abundantly clear that supplement product claims are not checked for accuracy or approved by the FDA and that the onus for ensuring the accuracy of the statements rests solely on the manufacturer. Did you miss the detail on the site you linked to where it says this specifically – i.e. “Manufacturers must make sure that product label information is truthful and not misleading.”

    Furthermore, LFVN’s website includes a (legally required) disclaimer indicating that none of the claims about the product have been evaluated by the FDA. People who are familiar with the regulatory process (i.e. DSHEA) know all of this, but you apparently do not (or you do and are just being deceptive on purpose).

    No claims about medicinal effects can LEGALLY be made about Protandim by anyone affiliated with the company. You should have known that too. In fact, LFVN has written a document for its distributors pointing out that they are not allowed to make any medicinal/therapeutic claims. So again, you are either ignorant or purposely lying.
    http://gopro10.com/To%20Say%20Or%20Not%20To%20Say.pdf

    Joe said: “All claims. If you’re talking about Bob down the street who sales it, and claims it does XYZ outside of what it legally claims; well that is the equivalent of blaming Ford for being shady because a local dealership owner of Ford vehicles told you the damn car could FLY.”

    You obviously know nothing about U.S law. LFVN is legally responsible for the claims its distributors make. LFVN has acknowledged this in their SEC filings. This is why they published the document above warning their distributors what not to say about the product – because the company doesn’t want to get caught and prosecuted for the illegal conduct of their sales force.

    Joe said: “I’m sure through your extensive research, you knew to simply check the FDA’s own website and view how many, if ANY warnings LifeVantage has received for their false claims or misleading information.”

    And? Are you seriously trying to equate lack of enforcement action with confirmation of legality? As LM pointed out, your logic is highly flawed (and you know it). If you have been beating your wife for 2 years but haven’t been arrested for it, it doesn’t mean that beating your wife is legal; it just means that you’ve been undeservedly fortunate so far.

    As for the BSCG, I fail to see how you could miss the point here. The LFVN press release implied that the BSCG determined that the products are safe for consumers. In fact, the BSCG does not perform formal safety tests; they only analyze for substances banned in athletic competition. An ingredient analysis is not a safety test. The press release was clearly misleading. The fact that BSCG only serves MLM supplement companies only adds a further level of taint, but it’s not the core issue.

    Joe said: “If you are allergic to any of the primary ingredients in Protandim, you may experience the side effects. Of course, that’s common sense.”

    What you are doing is trying to dismiss any and all potential side effects of Protandim as being merely the result of simple food allergies. That’s baseless. The company has not performed, nor are they legally required to perform, formal safety tests on the product. Nor are they legally allowed to make any claims about product safety; not even if the ingredients are GRAS. So presumably, the side effects that the company has warned in the product FAQ were reported by users of the product. I see no research on LFVNs part to indicate that the side effects are caused by food allergy. That’s another baseless assumption on your part. When you try to sweep things like this under the rug, and in such a deceptive manner, it’s clear that your interest is not in the safety and well being of consumers but rather in protecting YOUR interests.

    Joe said: “You find out ‘Oh! so if I’m allergic to any of this, I may experience the following… ok then!’.”

    How many people have you heard of who know that they are allergic to such esoteric ingredients as bacopa and ashwaganda? Your scenario is divorced from reality.

    Joe said: “But if you’re up for the challenge, as am I!! without regurtitating any of the BS you get told about the MLM business model, or LifeVantage, or Protandim, and without me regurgitating any of the BS given about how to reply to those who challenge the company.”

    You’ve already failed your own challenge – epically. All you have done so far is regurgitate BS.

    Joe said: “If you TRULY want to help others, then I’m inviting you to the challenge of getting to the bottom of things on BOTH sides (not a one sided research column). If you’re too busy, don’t feel you have/want to, etc etc, whatever excuse, then I understand, and oh well this’ll be my last post…”

    You’re inviting us??? We’ve already been doing the research, without your useless input, for close to 2 years. Obviously we’re not too busy and we’ve never stepped back from a challenge regarding the facts. Pompous clown! Bring you’re A-game next time, if you dare.

  6. Joe Jackson Says:

    Pompous clown???.. cute, however let’s save the name calling and other “useless” accusations and comments out of this discussion. DISCUSSION. I’m not here to sale or convince, or lie, or regurgitate, or scream bloody murder to any of you. If I’m wrong on a point/issue/example, then I’m wrong, which the author of the site has pointed out (respectfully, thank you), and now I will go back and continue my own research and prepare myself. Congrats to you on your two years of research, Vogel.

    As well, I’m inviting protandimscams, not VOGEL. Apologies if you’ve misread that my invitation was extended to more than one person, friend, regular or not. If you’re here to jump ship and say what the author has already told me, then please, save your own time and energy, it won’t go answered after this. One thing at a time, one topic at a time, one post at a time, one person at a time, please.

    I will return to the drawing board and do my research on the accusations and statements made in this post, as well as your reply protandimscams.

    Anyone else who reads this and replies in the future, let’s get PASSED the typical bs remark: “you’re another mindless drone useless idiot who fell into one of those scams, and doesn’t know what he’s talking about, and just spitting out the same crap you’re being told by the ‘MAN’” blah blah crap, if I’m wrong, a simple “you’re wrong, –xyzlink– is why” will suffice. Sounds fair?.. Hopefully you’d agree, otherwise this would only turn out to be another drawn out, 50-comment-based post like the hundreds of others out there with people arguing subjective topics about the industry/business/company. EVERY company has bad press, history, employees, management, the works. My goal here isn’t to just STOP at that, much like it isn’t to STOP at “BSCG only works with MLM, how shady!” (not an attack, by the way). It’s to ideally find out the “WHY”… Why did Dr. McCord “lie?” Why did this happen, etc etc.

    I’ve quickly found that when it comes to the masses and spreading information, some times people are too smart for their own good, and you have to take certain actions/steps to get past the flim flam and noise. For example (and quick side note): Dr McCord saying Protandim being all about prevention… I mean damn, REALLY!?!? that’s the GOAL here! He’s not on a commercial saying “Protandim WILL prevent cancer!” I truly believe that statement, for example again, was really taken out of context; especially if you link negative connotations to it, such as “Dr McCord is lying saying Protandim prevents cancer!”, and legal to say or not, you can’t always stop at “OMG he said a bad thing!! BAD MAN!” .. anyway, Vogel before you reply about anything further, give me at least 2 months, and I’ll surely return with what’s necessary to discuss. I only “invited” the author in case he could care less any more about it, OR, if he’s moved on, OR, as I have seen other bloggers reply to people, they are too busy to even discuss anymore. And I have yet to REGURGITATE anything we’ve been ‘trained’ to say ;-)..

    As well, so you understand where I’m even coming from, all lying BS or not, I personally have a downline of close friends/family who have thanked me for having given them Protandim, because of what it’s done for them medically and personally (a few financially), but please save your comments about this paragraph for another time, I’m not here again to recruit or make false claims/testimonials, but.. BUT, what else do you say to a person on your team who’s lost 90 lbs taking only this pill, and still eating Wendy’s? Luck?.. whatever the case is… THAT’S why I stand where I stand.. because yes, although I can’t currently debate the alleged facts on paper and what’s been said throughout this site, it doesn’t mean I don’t intend to, nor does it mean that it’s time to pack up, move on, and ignore the good emails and texts I get from friends/family/partners as well.

    I will return, more prepared :)

  7. protandimscams Says:

    Thanks for coming back, Joe Jackson. I thought you were gone, never to return.

    I want to start off by suggesting that Vogel authored this article. It is especially relevant for him to contribute to the discussion here. The point of these of these comments being open is for anyone to contribute as long as it is on the topic. That includes Vogel or LifeVantage themselves.

    The idea of inviting me to a challenge in my own comments is fairly comical. It is akin to you inviting me to have a discussion with yourself in my kitchen. It’s my kitchen. I am the one inviting you to comment and if I want to allow Vogel or LifeVantage into the kitchen to discuss as well, it’s up to me.

    This is only fair because it allows all points to be addressed by all people. This is the best way to have a complete discussion and not have any valid points missed.

    I understand your fear that this will turn out into a long 50-comment-based post like hundreds of others, but that doesn’t mean that those aren’t productive. If the discussion is fruitful, I integrate updates in the post. If it’s a case where every point in the comment is shown to be invalid or not conclusive, the reader can refer to the current discussion and not make the same errors.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “My goal here isn’t to just STOP at that, much like it isn’t to STOP at “BSCG only works with MLM, how shady!” (not an attack, by the way). It’s to ideally find out the “WHY”… Why did Dr. McCord “lie?” Why did this happen, etc etc.”

    So your question on this post could be “WHY did LifeVantage put out a press release saying that Protandim was tested safe for consumers?” If so, my answer would be so that they could sell more product. There are a percentage of LifeVantage distributors who will not look at what BSCG is and simply say, “LifeVantage has been found to be safe for consumers.” It’s a simple error on their part, but suddenly the bad information is passed through an entire downlines and LifeVantage and distributors are profitting from a misleading point LifeVantage purposely set up.

    And as to your question of “Why did Dr. McCord lie?”, the answer could very likely be how much he was paid. See: Dr. Joe McCord’s Financial Interest In LifeVantage/Protandim.

    Why did you put quotes around “lie” above? There’s no doubt that he did right? I mean we have evidence on the website, video evidence, and a letter of proof. There’s no reason to put quotes around lie as if it might not be true or inaccurate in any way.

    Joe Jackson said,

    “For example (and quick side note): Dr McCord saying Protandim being all about prevention… I mean damn, REALLY!?!? that’s the GOAL here! He’s not on a commercial saying ‘Protandim WILL prevent cancer!’ I truly believe that statement, for example again, was really taken out of context; especially if you link negative connotations to it, such as ‘Dr McCord is lying saying Protandim prevents cancer!’, and legal to say or not, you can’t always stop at ‘OMG he said a bad thing!! BAD MAN!’”

    It’s great the goal is prevention, but Protandim hasn’t been able to show it yet. Neither LifeVantage or McCord can legally make the claim about it preventing diseases. That’s why LifeVantage has the disclaimer at the bottom that it is not intended to prevent any disease. For McCord to make illegal claims in a sales brochure when he clearly should know better is a very bad thing. Yes that makes him a bad man. If it was a mistake own up to it and put out a press release saying, “we made an error and we’ve reported the error to the FDA.”

    If you think the comment was taken out of context read the article. Please understand that the brouchure was commissioned by LifeVantage itself as a sales tool for distributors to give prospects. It was an independent author at an independent magazine writing it.

    Also no one is saying that McCord is lying saying Proandim prevents cancer. No one, including LifeVantage, has any idea if it does or not because they haven’t started the very easy process of getting the necessary clinical trials underway. At this point, all we know is that Protandim has as much chance of preventing cancer as my morning toast. If I believed my morning toast could cure cancer, you can bet I’d be the first person in line at the FDA’s office with the paperwork to prove it so I can get my trillions. I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t do that.

    You really need at least 2 months to come back with anything further? Really?

    Joe Jackson said,

    “… what else do you say to a person on your team who’s lost 90 lbs taking only this pill, and still eating Wendy’s? Luck?”

    Wait a second… Now we are suggesting that this pill had something to do with weight-loss? Really? Weight-loss is well understood, calories in, calories out, etc. To attribute any kind of weight-loss there needs to be some kind of causitive effect, and not even LifeVantage has suggested any such thing is possible.

    There’s a thing called the placebo effect that explains any of the testimonies that you’ve gotten from any and all your friends. Please give it a look. Again, if the product actually worked, LifeVantage could show it through placebo controlled studies such as the ones that showed Orlistat (commonly known under the brand Alli) could help people lose weight. In 7 years they haven’t even started yet.

  8. Samantha Says:

    I tried Protandim. Took 2 pills total over the course of 2 days. I took as directed. I became VERY ill! Nowhere in a conversation with the distributor did she state that there could be side effects. I was at a Protandim presentation at said distributors home and it stated multiple times that there are no risks in taking Protandim and no contraindications. Protandum LIES! After becoming so sick, I looked up each herb that is in Protandim and each herb has it’s own slew of side effects and contraindications! There are prescription medications that taking with Protandim could be potentially FATAL! As with any medication and/or supplement – there are of course going to be contraindications AND side effects! For Protandim to claim that there are no contraindications is BS and seriously – you all need to be sued and run out of business! You are no better than big Pharma! All you care about is money – no matter to all of those being deceived and possibly made sick/or more sick by your crap in a bottle!

 

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